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Shaping Church Law Around the Year 1000

Shaping Church Law Around the Year 1000 PDF Author: Greta Austin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351900552
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 358
Book Description
This study of Burchard's 'Decretum', a popular book of Catholic canon law compiled just after the year 1000, sheds new light on the development of law and theology long before the Gregorian Reform, normally considered as a watershed in the history of the Latin Church. Practical episcopal concerns and an appreciation of new scholarly methods led Burchard to be dissatisfied with the quality of contemporary jurisprudence and particularly with the teaching texts available to local bishops. Drawing upon new manuscript discoveries, the author shows how Burchard tried to create a new text that would address these problems. He carefully selected and compiled canons from earlier collections and then went on to tamper systematically with the texts he had chosen. By doing so, he created a book of church law that appeared to be based on indisputable authority, that was internally consistent and that was easy to apply through logical extrapolation to new cases. The present study thus provides a window into the development of legal and theological reasoning in the medieval West, and suggests that, thanks to the work of ambitious bishops, the flowering of law and theology began far earlier, and for different reasons, than scholars have heretofore supposed.

Shaping Church Law Around the Year 1000

Shaping Church Law Around the Year 1000 PDF Author: Greta Austin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351900552
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 358
Book Description
This study of Burchard's 'Decretum', a popular book of Catholic canon law compiled just after the year 1000, sheds new light on the development of law and theology long before the Gregorian Reform, normally considered as a watershed in the history of the Latin Church. Practical episcopal concerns and an appreciation of new scholarly methods led Burchard to be dissatisfied with the quality of contemporary jurisprudence and particularly with the teaching texts available to local bishops. Drawing upon new manuscript discoveries, the author shows how Burchard tried to create a new text that would address these problems. He carefully selected and compiled canons from earlier collections and then went on to tamper systematically with the texts he had chosen. By doing so, he created a book of church law that appeared to be based on indisputable authority, that was internally consistent and that was easy to apply through logical extrapolation to new cases. The present study thus provides a window into the development of legal and theological reasoning in the medieval West, and suggests that, thanks to the work of ambitious bishops, the flowering of law and theology began far earlier, and for different reasons, than scholars have heretofore supposed.

The Use of Canon Law in Ecclesiastical Administration, 1000–1234

The Use of Canon Law in Ecclesiastical Administration, 1000–1234 PDF Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004387242
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 292
Book Description
The Use of Canon Law in Ecclesiastical Administration, 1000–1234 integrates the textual analysis necessary to understand the evolution and transmission of the legal tradition into the broader study of twelfth century ecclesiastical government and practice.

The Histories of a Medieval German City, Worms c. 1000-c. 1300

The Histories of a Medieval German City, Worms c. 1000-c. 1300 PDF Author: David S. Bachrach
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317028961
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 190
Book Description
Germany was the most powerful kingdom in the medieval West from the mid-tenth to the mid-thirteenth century. However, its history remains largely unknown outside of the German-speaking regions of modern Europe. Until recently, almost all of the sources for medieval Germany were available only in the original Latin or in German translations, while most scholarly investigation has been in German. The limited English-language scholarship has focused on royal politics and the aristocracy. Even today, English-speaking students will find very little about the lower social orders, or Germany’s urban centers that came to play an increasingly important role in the social, economic, political, religious, and military life of the German kingdom after the turn of the millennium. The translation of the four texts in this volume is intended to help fill these lacunae. They focus on the city of Worms in the period c.1000 to c.1300. From them readers can follow developments in this city over a period of almost three centuries from the perspective of writers who lived there, gaining insights about the lives of both rich and poor, Christian and Jew. No other city in Germany provides a similar opportunity for comparison of changes over time. As important, Worms was an ’early adopter’ of new political, economic, institutional, and military traditions, which would later become normative for cities throughout the German kingdom. Worms was one of the first cities to develop as a center of episcopal power; it was also one of the first to develop an independent urban government, and was precocious in emerging as a de facto city-state in the mid-thirteenth century. These political developments, with their concomitant social, economic, and military consequences, would define urban life throughout the German kingdom. In sum, the history of Worms as told in the narrative sources in this volume can be understood as illuminating the broader urban history of the German kingdom at the heigh

Using and Not Using the Past after the Carolingian Empire

Using and Not Using the Past after the Carolingian Empire PDF Author: Sarah Greer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429683030
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 310
Book Description
Using and Not Using the Past after the Carolingian Empire offers a new take on European history from c.900 to c.1050, examining the ‘post-Carolingian’ period in its own right and presenting it as a time of creative experimentation with new forms of authority and legitimacy. In the late eighth century, the Frankish king Charlemagne put together a new empire. Less than a century later, that empire had collapsed. The story of Europe following the end of the Carolingian empire has often been presented as a tragedy: a time of turbulence and disintegration, out of which the new, recognisably medieval kingdoms of Europe emerged. This collection offers a different perspective. Taking a transnational approach, the authors contemplate the new social and political order that emerged in tenth- and eleventh-century Europe and examine how those shaping this new order saw themselves in relation to the past. Each chapter explores how the past was used creatively by actors in the regions of the former Carolingian Empire to search for political, legal and social legitimacy in a turbulent new political order. Advancing the debates on the uses of the past in the early Middle Ages and prompting reconsideration of the narratives that have traditionally dominated modern writing on this period, Using and Not Using the Past after the Carolingian Empire is ideal for students and scholars of tenth- and eleventh-century European history.

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church PDF Author: Andrew Louth
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0192638157
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 2224
Book Description
Uniquely authoritative and wide-ranging in its scope, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church is the indispensable reference work on all aspects of the Christian Church. It contains over 6,500 cross-referenced A-Z entries, and offers unrivalled coverage of all aspects of this vast and often complex subject, from theology; churches and denominations; patristic scholarship; and the bible; to the church calendar and its organization; popes; archbishops; other church leaders; saints; and mystics. In this new edition, great efforts have been made to increase and strengthen coverage of non-Anglican denominations (for example non-Western European Christianity), as well as broadening the focus on Christianity and the history of churches in areas beyond Western Europe. In particular, there have been extensive additions with regards to the Christian Church in Asia, Africa, Latin America, North America, and Australasia. Significant updates have also been included on topics such as liturgy, Canon Law, recent international developments, non-Anglican missionary activity, and the increasingly important area of moral and pastoral theology, among many others. Since its first appearance in 1957, the ODCC has established itself as an essential resource for ordinands, clergy, and members of religious orders, and an invaluable tool for academics, teachers, and students of church history and theology, as well as for the general reader.

New Discourses in Medieval Canon Law Research

New Discourses in Medieval Canon Law Research PDF Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004394389
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 228
Book Description
The contributions in New Discourses in Medieval Canon Law Research present new research on medieval church law, and propose a new model of how to write the history of canon law in the Middle Ages.

Bishops, Authority and Community in Northwestern Europe, c.1050–1150

Bishops, Authority and Community in Northwestern Europe, c.1050–1150 PDF Author: John S. Ott
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107017815
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 300
Book Description
This important new study of episcopal office and clerical identity in a socially and culturally dynamic region of medieval Europe examines the construction and representation of episcopal power and authority in the archdiocese of Reims during the dynamic and sometimes turbulent century from 1050 to 1150. Drawing on a wide range of diplomatic, hagiographical, and other narrative sources, John S. Ott considers how bishops conceived of and projected their authority collectively and individually. In examining episcopal professional identities and notions of office, he explores how prelates used textual production and their physical landscapes to craft historical narratives and consolidate local and regional memories around ideals that established themselves as not only religious authorities but cultural arbiters. This study reveals that, far from being reactive and hostile to cultural and religious change, bishops regularly grappled with and sought to affect, positively and to their advantage, new and emerging cultural and religious norms.

Making Laws for a Christian Society

Making Laws for a Christian Society PDF Author: Roy Flechner
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351267221
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 196
Book Description
This is the first comprehensive study of the contribution that texts from Britain and Ireland made to the development of canon law in early medieval Europe. The book concentrates on a group of insular texts of church law—chief among them the Irish Hibernensis—tracing their evolution through mutual influence, their debt to late antique traditions from around the Mediterranean, their reception (and occasional rejection) by clerics in continental Europe, their fusion with continental texts, and their eventual impact on the formation of a European canonical tradition. Canonical collections, penitentials, and miscellanies of church law, and royal legislation, are all shown to have been 'living texts', which were continually reshaped through a process of trial and error that eventually gave rise to a more stable and more coherent body of church laws. Through a meticulous text-critical study Roy Flechner argues that the growth of church law in Europe owes as much to a serendipitous 'conversation' between texts as it does to any deliberate plan overseen by bishops and popes.

Readers, Texts and Compilers in the Earlier Middle Ages

Readers, Texts and Compilers in the Earlier Middle Ages PDF Author: Martin Brett
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351906704
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 226
Book Description
Reflecting the focus but also range of their honorand's work in medieval canon law in the era before Gratian, the essays in this volume explore the creation and transmission of canonical texts and the motives of their compilers but also address the issues of how the law was interpreted and used by diverse audiences in the earlier middle ages, with especial focus on the eleventh and early twelfth centuries. These issues have lain at the heart of Linda Fowler-Magerl's distinguished body of scholarly work on judicial ordines and procedural literature, on the transmission of canonical texts and their formal sources before Gratian, and perhaps most especially her pioneering role in the creation of a database of canon law manuscripts before Gratian now published as Clavis canonum. Linda Fowler-Magerl's work has fundamentally transformed our understanding of canonistic activity in the era before Gratian and its reception across the Church throughout Europe. Individually the scholars whose studies are included in this volume offer new viewpoints on several key issues and questions relating to the creation of canonical texts, the concerns of their compilers and the transmission of their work, as well as the use of such texts by readers with the most various interests in the period. As a whole, the volume contributes to an understanding of the increasing importance of the written law for a far wider circle than Roman reformers and local advocates. These issues are especially highlighted by the editors' introduction.

Medieval Canon Law

Medieval Canon Law PDF Author: James A. Brundage
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1000631494
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 230
Book Description
It is impossible to understand how the medieval church functioned and, in turn, influenced the lay world within its care without understanding "canon law". This book examines its development from its beginnings to the end of the Middle Ages, updating its findings in light of recent scholarly trends. This second edition has been fully revised and updated by Melodie H. Eichbauer to include additional material on the early Middle Ages; the significance of the discovery of earlier versions of Gratian’s Decretum; and the new research into law emanating from secular authorities, councils, episcopal acta, and juridical commentary to rethink our understanding of the sources of law and canon law's place in medieval society. Separate chapters examine canon law in intellectual spaces; the canonical courts and their procedures; and, using the case studies of deviation from orthodoxy and marriage, canon law in the lives of people. The main body of the book concludes with the influence of canon law in Western society, but has been reworked by integrating sections cut from the first edition chapters on canon law in private and public life to highlight the importance of this field of research. Throughout the work and found in the bibliography are references to current literature and resources in order to make researching in the field more accessible. The first appendix provides examples of how canonical texts are cited while the second offers biographical notes on canonists featured in the work. The end result is a second edition that is significantly rewritten and updated but retains the spirit of Brundage’s original text. Covering all aspects of medieval canon law and its influence on medieval politics, society, and culture, this book provides students of medieval history with an accessible overview of this foundational aspect of medieval history.