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Geography in Classical Antiquity

Geography in Classical Antiquity PDF Author: Daniela Dueck
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Classical geography
Languages : en
Pages : 142
Book Description

Geography in Classical Antiquity

Geography in Classical Antiquity PDF Author: Daniela Dueck
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Classical geography
Languages : en
Pages : 142
Book Description


Geography in Classical Antiquity

Geography in Classical Antiquity PDF Author: Daniela Dueck
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521197880
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 159
Book Description
An introduction to the earliest ideas of geography in antiquity and how much knowledge there was of the physical world.

Ancient Geography

Ancient Geography PDF Author: Duane W. Roller
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 0857739239
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 304
Book Description
The last dedicated book on ancient geography was published more than sixty years ago. Since then new texts have appeared (such as the Artemidoros palimpsest), and new editions of existing texts (by geographical authorities who include Agatharchides, Eratosthenes, Pseudo-Skylax and Strabo) have been produced. There has been much archaeological research, especially at the perimeters of the Greek world, and a more accurate understanding of ancient geography and geographers has emerged. The topic is therefore overdue a fresh and sustained treatment. In offering precisely that, Duane Roller explores important topics like knowledge of the world in the Bronze Age and Archaic periods; Greek expansion into the Black Sea and the West; the Pythagorean concept of the earth as a globe; the invention of geography as a discipline by Eratosthenes; Polybios the explorer; Strabo's famous Geographica; the travels of Alexander the Great; Roman geography; Ptolemy and late antiquity; and the cultural reawakening of antique geographical knowledge in the Renaissance, including Columbus' use of ancient sources.

Illiterate Geography in Classical Athens and Rome

Illiterate Geography in Classical Athens and Rome PDF Author: Daniela Dueck
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1000225046
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 280
Book Description
This study is devoted to the channels through which geographic knowledge circulated in classical societies outside of textual transmission. It explores understanding of geography among the non-elites, as opposed to scholarly and scientific geography solely in written form which was the province of a very small number of learned people. It deals with non-literary knowledge of geography, geography not derived from texts, as it was available to people, educated or not, who did not read geographic works. This main issue is composed of two central questions: how, if at all, was geographic data available outside of textual transmission and in contexts in which there was no need to write or read? And what could the public know of geography? In general, three groups of sources are relevant to this quest: oral communications preserved in writing; public non-textual performances; and visual artefacts and monuments. All these are examined as potential sources for the aural and visual geographic knowledge of Greco-Roman publics. This volume will be of interest to anyone working on geography in the ancient world and to those studying non-elite culture.

Illiterate Geography in Classical Athens and Rome

Illiterate Geography in Classical Athens and Rome PDF Author: Daniela Dueck
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780367439705
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 280
Book Description
This study is devoted to the channels through which geographic knowledge circulated in classical societies outside of textual transmission. It explores understanding of geography among the non-elites, as opposed to scholarly and scientific geography solely in written form which was the province of a very small number of learned people. It deals with non-literary knowledge of geography, geography not derived from texts, as it was available to people, educated or not, who did not read geographic works. This main issue is composed of two central questions: how, if at all, was geographic data available outside of textual transmission and in contexts in which there was no need to write or read? And what could the public know of geography? In general, three groups of sources are relevant to this quest: oral communications preserved in writing; public non-textual performances; and visual artefacts and monuments. All of these are examined as potential sources for the aural and visual geographic knowledge of Greco-Roman publics. This volume will be of interest to anyone working on geography in the ancient world and to those studying non-elite culture.

Texts and Culture in Late Antiquity

Texts and Culture in Late Antiquity PDF Author: J. H. D. Scourfield
Publisher: ISD LLC
ISBN: 1910589454
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 350
Book Description
Late Antiquity has increasingly been viewed as a period of transformation and dynamic change in its literature as in society and politics. In this volume, thirteen scholars focus on the intellectual and literary culture of the time, investigating complex relationships between late-Antique authors and the texts which they had inherited through the classical ('pagan') and Christian traditions. Particular emphasis is placed on works that carried special authority: Homer, Virgil, Plato, and the Bible. The volume thus contributes to the history of the reception of classical texts, and through its inclusiveness (classical and classicizing, philosophical, and patristic writing are all represented) seeks to offer a view of the textual world of late Antiquity as a unified whole. It affords a scholarly introduction to a sweep of late-Antique literature in Greek and Latin. Authors and genres discussed include Juvencus and Claudian, Plotinus and Proclus, Jerome and John Cassian, geographical and grammatical writing, and Christian cento.

Ancient Geography

Ancient Geography PDF Author: Duane W. Roller
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 0857725661
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 304
Book Description
Before Columbus there was Eratosthenes: 'inventor' of the discipline of geography as it is known today. There was Alexander the Great: the man who sought to reach the very ends of the known world and whose empire spanned three continents. And there was Strabo: author of the Geographica, a 17-volume encyclopaedia of geographical knowledge which expounded the definition, history and mathematics of geography. In this, the first major study of ancient geography and geographers to be published in English for over 60 years, Duane W. Roller offers a comprehensive account of these, and the many other, ancient pioneers and the frontiers that defined their world. Ranging from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity, Ancient Geography: The Discovery of the World in Classical Greece and Rome is the definitive guide to how the triumphs and the errors of antiquity laid the foundations for millennia of voyaging and exploration.

History and Geography in Late Antiquity

History and Geography in Late Antiquity PDF Author: A. H. Merrills
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521846011
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 422
Book Description
Examines the role of geography in the historical writings of the early medieval period.

New Classical Dictionary of Biography, Mythology and Geography

New Classical Dictionary of Biography, Mythology and Geography PDF Author: sir William Smith
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Classical dictionaries
Languages : en
Pages :
Book Description


The Place of Geography

The Place of Geography PDF Author: Tim Unwin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317899962
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 288
Book Description
The Place of Geography is designed to provide a readable and yet challenging account of the emergence of gepgraphy as an academic discipline. It has three particular aims: it seeks to trace the development of geography back to its formal roots in classical antiquity; provides an interpretation of the changes that have taken place in geographical practice within the context of Jurgen Haberma's critical theory; and thirdly, describes how the increasing separation of geography into physical and human parts has been detrimental to our understanding of critical issues concerning the relationship between people and environment.